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Gambling Room

 

 

 

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Chips & Plaques of The World

by John Benedict

Benedict, August, 1999


Chips & Plaques of The World - Part 1

The purpose of this series is to assist the collector in identifying the many different types of chips and plaques produced in the last 100 years.

The initial introduction portion of the series will consist of some 30+ segments; each describing and illustrating examples of the type.


(1) PLASTIC ENCAPSULATED:


This type of piece was predominately used in South American countries. They were produced in such a manner where the graphics were printed on a wafer-thin layer of paper, foil or plastic and encapsulated in a thick transparent plastic shell. These chips were able to withstand many years of play, as the printed surface was never touched. Such pieces were known to exist in Argentina and Paraguay.

 

JB

 


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Welcome to MONTECARLOCASINOCHIPS.COM

Monaco was a very small and impoverished country when Prince Charles III introduced gambling as a source of revenue in 1866. Within 3 years this new source of income became so rewarding that direct forms of taxation were eliminated. A new casino was opened in 1904 called the International Sporting Club. This second casino was needed to help accommodate the burgeoning tourist business to Monte Carlo'€™s recreational areas.

 

 

A third casino owned by the Loews Corporation opened in 1975 and is more of an American style operation. The blackjack, Nevada craps, slot machines, and American roulette provide a more familiar atmosphere for visiting Americans. Gaming chips used at Loews are familiar Bud Jones metal inlays.

 

 

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Chips & Plaques of The World

by John Benedict

Benedict, August, 1999


Chips & Plaques of The World - Part 2

 


(2) UNPROTECTED PASTEBOARD:

Several varieties of this type manufacture have long been obsolete, as they were mostly produced in the early-1900s.

The pieces consisted of a pasteboard base about 5mm thick with a printed layer of paper glued to the surface. The reverse was usually a heavy, coarse paper stock able to withstand table friction. The edge was sealed with a metalic foil that also helped to prevent moisture and body oil from entering the laminated layers during play and storage. Both the obverse and reverse were unprotected, and those pieces found without heavy wear or being soiled are very desirable.

These types of chips and plaques were known to be used in France, Spain, Poland and Belgium.

JB


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